Step-by-Step Guide to (Mostly) Opting Out of Fiat

in finance •  3 months ago  (edited)

I got this bug in my brain this morning about how I mostly opt out of fiat.

This presupposes you already understand how the fractional reserve monetary system creates mass evil in the world and that you don't want to be part of it. If you aren't at that point, feel free to continue your education into how fiat works.

So what I do is keep minimal amounts in the banking system, which minimizes the amount I participate in the fraudulent system.

Step 1: Do your books. Know what kind of expenses you have. Make sure you have spread. You need to be increasing your assets, not consuming them.

Step 2: Understand your spread. How much variance does it have? How reliable is your income? If things went to hell, what expenses can you cut? That's going to come up here in a second.

Step 3: Create a cash emergency fund. Use that spread to build up at least 3, and preferably more, months of savings. In cash. Like actual bills of currency that you own.

Step 4: You'll probably notice at this point that your spread is increasing. That's because when you do your books you are paying attention to both your income and your expenses. When that happens, you tend to spend less. OK, time to get a good credit card if you don't already have one. All possible spending should go on the credit card. Pay it off each month in full. This helps control your cash flow. At this point, income comes in, builds up, and goes down in one large shot. Self-discipline is key here. If you go nuts and run up a balance AND keep high cash balances you are shooting yourself in the foot!

Step 5: Now that your basic cash flow pattern is set, it's time to start opting out. Evaluate your burn rate (expenses) and your base line projection of income. Then start learning about infinite banking. This is a process of using insurance contracts to hold your capital. The downside of doing this is that while your capital is very strongly guaranteed, you lose liquidity in the first few years. Again, this is where the spread comes in. Infinite banking does essentially two things at the same time: it gets your capital out of the banking system and it inflation-proofs your capital. Nelson Nash is the guy who came up with this, so read his book on it.

Step 6: Once you have sufficient balance in your infinite bank (this should happen quickly), now your cash flow pattern changes:

  • Charge your expenses on your credit card.
  • Bill comes due.
  • Take a loan from your infinite bank, which is deposited into your checking account.
  • Pay the credit card from your checking account.
  • As income comes in, it goes back into the infinite bank.

Boom. Now your fiat banking account is only holding balances for the time it takes to process deposits and withdrawals - maybe 5 days because of the archaic system it runs on.

More importantly, you are taking control of your capital and cash flow. When you deem it appropriate, you can further diversify away from fiat by legging into crypto.

For most people, this whole process will take 2 or so years. If you are aggressive about it, you can do it in one.

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The link to book didn't work for me.

Should be working now.

Seems legit, but being able to control your expenses is an art these days haha

lol truth.

Hi @nealmcspadden
Thanks for this post.
I am in this process and I am contemptplating this step:

Step 6: Once you have sufficient balance in your infinite bank (this should happen quickly), now your cash flow pattern changes:
Charge your expenses on your credit card.
Bill comes due.
Take a loan from your infinite bank, which is deposited into your checking account.
Pay the credit card from your checking account.
As income comes in, it goes back into the infinite bank.
Boom. Now your fiat banking account is only holding balances for the time it takes to process deposits and withdrawals - maybe 5 days because of the archaic system it runs on.

In your experience this loan comes quickly enough to pay bills?
That was my question. I am still reading the book by Mr. N
I am contemplating starting with my children’s WLP and having their rent deposited there as cash value. I watched an IBC video which showed how with 10% base premium and 90% PUA allotment you could have cash value to borrow practically from Day#1.
But I am looking for someone who actually did it.
@shortsegments

Just seeing this now.

Speed of the loan depends on the company. The insurance companies are not quite up to what we would call the current state of technology. One company I work with direct deposits my loans in 1 or 2 business days, but the request to get the loan is done by mail or fax.

The other comapny I currently use has an online loan request, but then they mail a check.

So for me, I just request a block amount every month, pay the CC, keep enough in the checking account to cover the few things that I can't put on CC, and send the rest back.

And yeah, there are lots of arguments among IBC people about the exact right ratios of PUA and such. It depends on your needs, so it's a case by case basis. Just make sure whatever agents you talk to have been trained by the Nelson Nash Institute.

Thanks for your reply.
I am still working on those ratios with my agent.
But it really helps to know how this works once you get it set up. The details of how you get and reuse the money are important.
Thanks

Yeah. The simplest way to think of it is that your policies become your savings accounts and your bank account becomes your minimal transaction account.

That is a good analogy.
Thanks